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photo Introducing TJ
Therapeutic Jurisprudence
By Mary Providence Magill

Therapeutic Jurisprudence represents a new approach to meeting the needs of mentally ill people confronting a judicial system which frequently sends them to jail for minor offenses when they, and their communities as well, would be better served by referrals to good mental health programs.

The remarkable Judge Ginger Lerner-Wren of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, has been instrumental in developing and heading the first Mental Health Court in the country. Under her guidance, people suffering from severe mental disorders are separated out from the general criminal population and given special attention, including referrals to therapy, rehabilitation, and housing. As she says in the film, "People who are ill should be with doctors, not with jailers.

27 minutes
© 2000
Purchase $129 DVD
Order No. QA-351

Reviews
"Offers a powerful, enlightening and evocative demonstration of a problem, and a compelling solution." Sarasota Herald-Tribune

"Really an inspiration." The Nation

Awards & Conference Screenings
Brooklyn Film Festival Premiere

Related Films
Hidden Wounds: Through three disturbing portraits of Iraq veterans, this powerful documentary highlights the issue of post-traumatic stress disorder, estimated to affect as many as one in five soldiers returning from the war in Iraq.

Meet Us Where We Are: People with physical and developmental disabilities are frequent victims of crime, but the problem has been under-reported, and sometimes ignored by government and community agencies.

The Time is Now: People with physical and developmental disabilities are frequent victims of crime, but the problem has been under-reported, and sometimes ignored by government and community agencies.

The Dark Side of the Moon: The stories of three mentally disabled men, formerly homeless, who have overcome despair, stigma and isolation to become valued members of their community.

Working Like Crazy: Once labeled "unemployable," these psychiatric survivors work and run businesses where they can make a living, rebuild their lives, connect with others, and contribute to society.

The Drop-in Group: A training package which profiles an AIDS prevention and education program for the mentally ill.

A Passion for Justice: Bob Perske, author of Unequal Justice, crusades for the legal rights of people with developmental disabilities including some who have been convicted of crimes they did not commit.


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